A Fox in the House

A century-old abandoned farmhouse is alive with activity after the sun goes down, offering a unique opportunity to photograph wildlife with a DSLR camera trap.

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A Nikon d3200 body, 18mm lens, motion detector and 2 flashes make up the camera trap system.  All equipment is secured in weatherproof housings.

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The equipment is set up and focused on the crawl space entrance.

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Over a period of several nights, the camera captures images of a grey fox, ringtail cat, and other critters coming and going.

Gray fox entering old house
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Now… why not move indoors?  The interior of the old house is bleak but has potential as an interesting backdrop for wildlife photos.

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So, the camera trap is moved “indoors” and secured with a locking cable snaked through holes in the floor and around a solid joist.

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Once the camera and flashes are aimed, focused, and ready, the camera trap is tested by moving in front of the camera’s motion detector- note the flash on the left firing as the camera is triggered.  The camera is initially allowed to “soak” undisturbed for 1 week so the wild residence become more tolerant of it and more willing to walk near it.

Setting up camera

After a week’s time, the camera is checked.  It is always an exciting moment when the case is opened and the SD card is pulled.

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The camera set up is moved to a new corner of the house and allowed to soak again.

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And one last move…

Gray fox stare
Gray fox

4 thoughts on “A Fox in the House

  1. Great stuff man! Helluva job, my wife just became a fan of Grey Foxes when she saw your shots. She said and I quote “oh, I didn’t know they were so cute”. ‘Course, she aint from Texas. 😉

    We really enjoy your work, well done!

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